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Caroline N Dealy PhD

TitleAssociate Professor
InstitutionUConn Health Center
DepartmentReconstructive Sciences
AddressMC 3705
MC 3705
263 Farmington Avenue
Phone860-679-1193
Fax860-679-2910
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    Other Positions
    TitleAssociate Professor
    InstitutionUConn Health Center
    DepartmentOrthopaedic Surgery


    Collapse Biography 
    Collapse awards and honors
    2012Connecticut Women of Innovation: finalist, Entrepreneurial Innovation Award, Connecticut Technology Council

    Collapse Overview 
    Collapse overview
    Dr. Dealy’s research program is centered on her long-standing interest in the development of the human skeleton. Dr. Dealy’s studies are investigating mechanisms and potential treatments for debilitating human conditions such as osteoarthritis, dwarfism, limb birth defects and traumatic limb loss. The overall goal of her work is to develop novel therapeutic approaches for lost or damaged skeletal tissue.

    Dr. Dealy is active in biotechnology. She is the co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Chondrogenics, Inc., a UConn Ventures company and Connecticut Technology Council “Company to Watch”. Dr. Dealy is leading a joint effort between Chondrogenics and the University of Connecticut to develop stem-cell based approaches to treat cartilage injury and osteoarthritis. Dr. Dealy is a Connecticut Women of Innovation Entrepreneur finalist

    In addition to her research program, Dr. Dealy is active in graduate teaching, mentoring and curriculum development. She is the Director of the Skeletal, Craniofacial and Oral Biology graduate PhD program. She is also the founder and director of the UConn-TIP Bioscience & STEM Intern program, which provides research internships for UConn undergraduate students in UConn's biotechnology startup companies. Dr. Dealy has also developed a service and outreach program in developmental biology for the K-12 domain. Dr. Dealy is a member of the Connecticut Stem Cell Institute and the UConn Center for Regenerative Engineering, is on the Editorial board for several scientific journals, and serves on national peer review panels in ageing, development, and arthritis.



    Collapse Bibliographic 
    Collapse selected publications
    Publications listed below are automatically derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and other sources, which might result in incorrect or missing publications. Faculty can login to make corrections and additions.
    List All   |   Timeline
    1. Patterson SE, Dealy CN. Mechanisms and models of endoplasmic reticulum stress in chondrodysplasia. Dev Dyn. 2014 Jul; 243(7):875-93. PMID: 24668528.
      View in: PubMed
    2. Patterson SE, Dealy CN . Mechanisms and models of ER stress in chondrodysplasia. Developmental Dynamics, In Press. 2014.
    3. Dealy CN. Rheumatology Current Research Special Issue on Cartilage Progenitors. Chondrogenic progenitors for cartilage repair and osteoarthritis treatment. 2013.
    4. Shepard JB, Jeong JW, Maihle NJ, O'Brien S, Dealy CN. Transient anabolic effects accompany epidermal growth factor receptor signal activation in articular cartilage in vivo. Arthritis Res Ther. 2013; 15(3):R60. PMID: 23705804; PMCID: PMC4060279.
    5. Fisher M, Ferrari D, Li Y, Shepard JB, Patterson S, Anderson N, Dealy CN. The potential of human embryonic stem cells for articular cartilage repair and osteoarthritis treatment. Rheumatology Current Research. 2012; S3.
    6. Wang CK, Tsugane MH, Scranton V, Kosher RA, Pierro LJ, Upholt WB, Dealy CN. Pleiotropic patterning response to activation of Shh signaling in the limb apical ectodermal ridge. Dev Dyn. 2011 May; 240(5):1289-302. PMID: 21465622; PMCID: PMC3273424.
    7. Ferrari D Gong G, Kosher RA, Dealy CN. Springer Protocols Handbooks. Lineage-Specific Differentiation of Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Methods and Protocols. 2011; 359-367.
    8. Gong G, Ferrari D, Dealy CN, Kosher RA. Direct and progressive differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into the chondrogenic lineage. J Cell Physiol. 2010 Sep; 224(3):664-71. PMID: 20432462.
      View in: PubMed
    9. Matsumoto K, Li Y, Jakuba C, Sugiyama Y, Sayo T, Okuno M, Dealy CN, Toole BP, Takeda J, Yamaguchi Y, Kosher RA. Conditional inactivation of Has2 reveals a crucial role for hyaluronan in skeletal growth, patterning, chondrocyte maturation and joint formation in the developing limb. Development. 2009 Aug; 136(16):2825-35. PMID: 19633173; PMCID: PMC2730409.
    10. Chin HJ, Fisher MC, Li Y, Ferrari D, Wang CK, Lichtler AC, Dealy CN, Kosher RA. Studies on the role of Dlx5 in regulation of chondrocyte differentiation during endochondral ossification in the developing mouse limb. Dev Growth Differ. 2007 Aug; 49(6):515-21. PMID: 17555518.
      View in: PubMed
    11. Fisher MC, Clinton GM, Maihle NJ, Dealy CN. Requirement for ErbB2/ErbB signaling in developing cartilage and bone. Dev Growth Differ. 2007 Aug; 49(6):503-13. PMID: 17555517.
      View in: PubMed
    12. Li Y, Toole BP, Dealy CN, Kosher RA. Hyaluronan in limb morphogenesis. Dev Biol. 2007 May 15; 305(2):411-20. PMID: 17362908; PMCID: PMC2077829.
    13. Fisher MC, Li Y, Seghatoleslami MR, Dealy CN, Kosher RA. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans including syndecan-3 modulate BMP activity during limb cartilage differentiation. Matrix Biol. 2006 Jan; 25(1):27-39. PMID: 16226436.
      View in: PubMed
    14. Fisher MC, Meyer C, Garber G, Dealy CN. Role of IGFBP2, IGF-I and IGF-II in regulating long bone growth. Bone. 2005 Dec; 37(6):741-50. PMID: 16183342.
      View in: PubMed
    15. Omi M, Fisher M, Maihle NJ, Dealy CN. Studies on epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in vertebrate limb patterning. Dev Dyn. 2005 Jun; 233(2):288-300. PMID: 15778992.
      View in: PubMed
    16. Wang CK, Omi M, Ferrari D, Cheng HC, Lizarraga G, Chin HJ, Upholt WB, Dealy CN, Kosher RA. Function of BMPs in the apical ectoderm of the developing mouse limb. Dev Biol. 2004 May 1; 269(1):109-22. PMID: 15081361.
      View in: PubMed
    17. McQueeney K, Soufer R, Dealy CN. Beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling in apical ectodermal ridge induction and FGF8 expression in normal and limbless mutant chick limbs. Dev Growth Differ. 2002 Aug; 44(4):315-25. PMID: 12175366.
      View in: PubMed
    18. McQueeney K, Dealy CN. Roles of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-I binding protein-2 (IGFBP2) and -5 (IGFBP5) in developing chick limbs. Growth Horm IGF Res. 2001 Dec; 11(6):346-63. PMID: 11914022.
      View in: PubMed
    19. Ferrari D, Harrington A, Dealy CN, Kosher RA. Dlx-5 in limb initiation in the chick embryo. Dev Dyn. 1999 Sep; 216(1):10-5. PMID: 10474161.
      View in: PubMed
    20. Ianakiev P, Kilpatrick MW, Dealy C, Kosher R, Korenberg JR, Chen XN, Tsipouras P. A novel human gene encoding an F-box/WD40 containing protein maps in the SHFM3 critical region on 10q24. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1999 Jul 22; 261(1):64-70. PMID: 10405324.
      View in: PubMed
    21. Lizarraga G, Ferrari D, Kalinowski M, Ohuchi H, Noji S, Kosher RA, Dealy CN. FGFR2 signaling in normal and limbless chick limb buds. Dev Genet. 1999; 25(4):331-8. PMID: 10570465.
      View in: PubMed
    22. Dealy CN, Scranton V, Cheng HC. Roles of transforming growth factor-alpha and epidermal growth factor in chick limb development. Dev Biol. 1998 Oct 1; 202(1):43-55. PMID: 9758702.
      View in: PubMed
    23. Ferrari D, Lichtler AC, Pan ZZ, Dealy CN, Upholt WB, Kosher RA. Ectopic expression of Msx-2 in posterior limb bud mesoderm impairs limb morphogenesis while inducing BMP-4 expression, inhibiting cell proliferation, and promoting apoptosis. Dev Biol. 1998 May 1; 197(1):12-24. PMID: 9578615.
      View in: PubMed
    24. Dealy CN. Hensen's node provides an endogenous limb-forming signal. Dev Biol. 1997 Aug 15; 188(2):216-23. PMID: 9268570.
      View in: PubMed
    25. Dealy CN, Seghatoleslami MR, Ferrari D, Kosher RA. FGF-stimulated outgrowth and proliferation of limb mesoderm is dependent on syndecan-3. Dev Biol. 1997 Apr 15; 184(2):343-50. PMID: 9133440.
      View in: PubMed
    26. Dealy CN, Clarke K, Scranton V. Ability of FGFs to promote the outgrowth and proliferation of limb mesoderm is dependent on IGF-I activity. Dev Dyn. 1996 Aug; 206(4):463-9. PMID: 8853995.
      View in: PubMed
    27. Dealy CN, Kosher RA. IGF-I and insulin in the acquisition of limb-forming ability by the embryonic lateral plate. Dev Biol. 1996 Jul 10; 177(1):291-9. PMID: 8660895.
      View in: PubMed
    28. Dealy CN, Kosher RA. IGF-I, insulin and FGFs induce outgrowth of the limb buds of amelic mutant chick embryos. Development. 1996 Apr; 122(4):1323-30. PMID: 8620859.
      View in: PubMed
    29. Dealy CN, Kosher RA. Studies on insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin in chick limb morphogenesis. Dev Dyn. 1995 Jan; 202(1):67-79. PMID: 7703522.
      View in: PubMed
    30. Ferrari D, Kosher RA, Dealy CN. Limb mesenchymal cells inhibited from undergoing cartilage differentiation by a tumor promoting phorbol ester maintain expression of the homeobox-containing gene Msx1 and fail to exhibit gap junctional communication. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1994 Nov 30; 205(1):429-34. PMID: 7999059.
      View in: PubMed
    31. Dealy CN, Beyer EC, Kosher RA. Expression patterns of mRNAs for the gap junction proteins connexin43 and connexin42 suggest their involvement in chick limb morphogenesis and specification of the arterial vasculature. Dev Dyn. 1994 Feb; 199(2):156-67. PMID: 8204908.
      View in: PubMed
    32. Dealy CN, Roth A, Ferrari D, Brown AM, Kosher RA. Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a are expressed in the developing chick limb bud in a manner suggesting roles in pattern formation along the proximodistal and dorsoventral axes. Mech Dev. 1993 Oct; 43(2-3):175-86. PMID: 8297789.
      View in: PubMed
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